A tow bar on a V7Sport? – 27 Nov 2017.

All year I have been threatening to fit a tow bar to the V7Sport which generally has caused some amusement whenever it’s been mentioned. Nevertheless I did make a start on fabricating a hitch at the beginning of July. The plan had been to have it fitted and useable by the MGCGB Guzzi Festival in August but, what with one thing and another, I was nowhere near being ready and I went on The Fire Bike instead. I had been reluctant to post my progress as I went in case it all turned out wrong. However, today I’ve revisited the project and have decided to file a report as I can’t see why it shouldn’t work.

Firstly, why would I want to do such a thing? I enjoy attending camps and rallies and, having towed my trailer behind The Fire Bike, have found this to suit me. I can carry whatever I want for a comfortable weekend (without being too silly) and don’t have to crush everything to fit into panniers. My stuff stays dry and I can carry bulky but light items which I would usually have to leave at home. Now I will have a choice of bike to take on these jaunts.

Next I had to come up with a design. I don’t mind the Fire Bike being permanently fitted with a hitch but I wanted something for Rhino that could easily be removed. I’ve looked at tow hitches fitted to other Tonti framed Guzzis and found that there seem to be two main types. The first sort is bolted to the same bolts on each side that fasten the lower frame rails to the main bike frame. Tubes/bars then run back to the tow ball. This lot is then held up by stays to the rearmost part of the seat tubes where the seat pivots on a V7Sport. The second type of bracket is fastened to the upper part of the frame and then curves down in an S shape to the tow ball behind the wheel. This is then stabilised by bars running forward to the footpegs. I decided to base my design on the first style.

The first difficulty was that, on the V7Sport, things are very busy in this area on the left side due to the rear brake arrangements. The brackets can’t be fitted on the outside of the frame joint because the brake pedal is there. On the inside there’s not much clearance between frame and swing arm.

What I decided to do was to make a heavy metal bracket to connect to the two bolts and to the bolt on the footrest bracket that mounts the silencers. I could use this to then provide mounting points behind the pillion footrests and build the tow bar proper back from there. The flat brackets would be able to remain in place when the rest of the tow bar is removed.

To this end I removed the footrest brackets and used them to mark out hardboard templates before cutting out the final version. It turned out that, due to the restricted space on the left side of the frame, I couldn’t quite do things as I had wanted. I found that I could mount the plate to the forward bolt in the pair but not the rearward one. The nut on that bolt is already chamfered to gain clearance and the thickness of the plate would make it hit the swing arm. I did think about using a half thickness nut but realise this would have to be chamfered and I wouldn’t be able to get a spanner on it. I did make a smaller nut (17mm instead of 19mm) but it still didn’t really work. In the end I drilled a clearance hole and left that bolt alone. On that side the plate will be held by the one bolt here and the other where the exhaust mounts. The modified pattern is a slightly different shape to maintain strength. It was offered up before both metal plates were cut and fitted. I had to replace three of the frame bolts with slightly longer ones.

I had to cut some packing pieces to fit between each footrest bracket at the silencer bolt and my new plate.

The two unpainted plates have been left on the bike since then and you’d only notice them if you went looking for them.

I bought some solid steel bar from Eifion who made the tow bracket/pannier frame for my V7 loop. I got the same stuff as he had used. A lot of time was then spent measuring and working out how these bars should be bent. I made a template board up and then took it with the bars back to Eifion who bent them to fit. It would have taken me ages. He did it in 10 minutes.

I did weld flat plates to the forward ends of the bars after cutting them to length but that’s as far as it went. I’ve not had time to do any more since the beginning of August.

I’ve now got the bike up on the bench and the bars bolted to their brackets at the front end. The rear section is positioned on my old home-made lift. I constructed this about ten years ago to hold my old 750S3 when I put it together for the first time. It clamps to the edges of the bench and has a thread to raise the cross piece on each side. I had intended to cut it down as its height gets in the way sometimes. I’m glad I didn’t!

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