That V7 generator belt – 06 Jun 2015.

After mentioning my noisy drive belt and following advice from various people on how to cure it I got no improvement. It insisted on shrieking so, on my return from holiday, I bought a replacement from Gutsibits. I compared the two and, although different makes, they both have the same code – SPZ 737. The new belt seems slightly wider and, lo and behold, the problem seems to have gone. Result.

It’s interesting because the paperwork I received with the bike includes a receipt for fitting a new belt when the dynamo was rebuilt in 2013. It’s done no real mileage since then. I’ve not been out and about that much.

  • May 2012, shown in “for sale” video in Italy¬† – 43550 Km.
  • March 2013 MOT – 43581 Km.
  • September 2014 MOT – 43621 Km.
  • October 2014 when I bought it – 43634 Km.
  • Now – 44864 Km.

In view of the lack of use, I decided to change the engine and gearbox oils. I don’t know how long they’ve been in there or if they are the correct spec. Thankfully, no nasties were found.

I had been tempted to get rid of the ugly engine oil dipstick/filler but it makes life so much easier and I’ll be keeping it. I measured the amount I put in and found that, when on the centre stand, the 3 litres required brings the level to the maximum mark on the dipstick when it’s just inserted in the tube. Not pushed right home – just the same as on my Fiat!

 photo DSCF1563-1.jpg

This is what you usually get and is the one on Rhino.

 photo DSCF1564-1.jpg

Talk to you again soon!

Trial fittings – 06 Jun 2015.

It’s about time I brought you up to date with progress on Rhino the V7Sport.

A couple of weeks ago I test fitted the fuel tank more to see what it will look like than anything else. I’m having trouble getting everything seated on the various support rubbers and will have to experiment with positioning until they are right. Having got this far the seat was put on. It just had to be done.

 photo DSCF1425.jpg

 photo DSCF1431.jpg

 photo DSCF1434-1.jpg

It’s looking very pretty. The seat cover is not perfect but is original. I’ll take it off and clean up the seat base and see how it looks when everything else is done. I fitted the rear mudguard using the proper thumb bolts and washers. The bike has never had these in all the 37 years I’ve owned it till now. Looking at the parts book, I see that there should be a rubber gasket between the tail light bracket and mudguard. Again I’ve never seen one of these. It seems you can still get them but I made one from some 2mm rubber I had in my gasket box.

 photo DSCF1442.jpg

 photo DSCF1441.jpg

 photo DSCF1443.jpg

I added the tail light as well but forgot to take a photo!

I had taken the toolbox locks to bits a year ago so they could go for chroming. Happily I made notes of what belonged where and stuck the various parts to a sheet of paper so they could not get muddled/lost.

 photo DSCF1438.jpg

 photo DSCF1439.jpg

Again I used the info from Greg Bender’s site on dismantling the locks and all went back together with only one mishap. There are 8 tiny springs in each lock and, when I got to number 16, I managed to fire it into the air. I didn’t hear it land and it took 40 minutes of searching but I did find it.

The locks were fitted to the toolboxes and these in turn were fitted to the frame using new rubber washers etc.

 photo DSCF1448-1.jpg

 photo DSCF1447-1.jpg

I know I’ve got to take the tank and seat off again but the bike is looking how I want it to be.

Since doing this, I’ve been on holiday for a week then generally “under the weather” so nothing more has been done. I’ve also got some DIY to do now but I’ll be back soon.